ANNIVERSARY COUNTDOWN: 5 YEARS OF INFINITE HOUSE OF BOOKS COUNTDOWN – JANUARY TO JUNE 2014 RECAP

INFINITE HOUSE OF BOOKS turns 5 years old in April of 2017. Due to a massive failure with the blog’s previous hosting provider, all blogs prior to February 2015 were lost. However, the administrator has the original assets on file and a calendar of  featured content. As a lead-up to the anniversary, features will be released on the fifth of each month that chronicle a period in the blog’s past and some of the highlights still worth noting today. This post is the fifth in the series. Enjoy!

Both INFINITE HOUSE OF BOOKS and sister excerpts site DISCOVER WORDS covered a lot of books in this six month period. In fact, for one month (May 2014), DISCOVER WORDS featured more content than INFINITE HOUSE OF BOOKS.

 

January:  A Season Without Rain

You can still get this title for Kindle on in print on Amazon.

Here’s the original interview:

What initially got you interested in writing?

            I guess you could say I’ve always been into reading and making the leap to writer was something I found natural. My first real push was as a teenager when I spent a summer inventing a role-playing game to play with my friends. It gave me a taste of how good it felt to tell an original story. I also found out that my imagination could run wild and by the end of the summer I was as curious as to how the story ended as my buddies.

How did you decide to make the move into becoming a published author?

            I had sold a screenplay to a local production company. The money I made from it was some of the best I had ever known because writing had put it in my pocket. Shortly after the script, I met the person who would not only encourage me to novelize the screenplay, but who would go on to edit my work, effectively teaching me the mechanics I so desperately lacked.

What do you want readers to take away from reading your works?

            That everybody has an interesting, complex story to tell. Of course, nobody thinks they’re life or job is interesting but that is because they cannot escape it. Usually when you meet a writer you have loved they almost always fail to meet the expectations you’ve built up in your mind for them. I remember meeting Elmore Leonard. He was probably the most humble guy in the world, the complete opposite of his tough talking underworld characters. The only thing I want when someone finishes something I’ve written is to think, now that was one hell of a story.

What do you find most rewarding about writing?

            Meeting the people at book signings or getting e-mails from readers. The first rule of writing for me is to entertain the people. I don’t care if you’ve won a Pulitzer or a Noble Prize, if you’re a boring writer, only the critics are going to love you. I rather I was reviled by the snotty literati and a champion of the people than have a bunch of worthless trophies sitting on my mantle gathering dust.

What do you find most challenging about writing?

            Finding the time to do it. You make time for the things you love but some days it is like having another full-time job. Writing, of course, in hindsight seems magical. In reality, it is hard work and not for the undisciplined. I have been known to get up at 4a.m. just to write. Worse than writing is when the real blood is being spilled and you are going over your 7th or 12th draft of a novel you once adored and now can’t stand the fact you dared to think you could write it. I suppose it’s all worth it but it is a damn long road every time to ‘The End.’

What advice would you give to people wanting to enter the field?

            Believe what you are doing is important. If you have any doubt in yourself as a writer it will come through in your work. There should be no more harsh a critic of you than yourself. Like my editor once told me, it says written by on the cover-not edited. Once your little baby enters the world there is no taking it back. Do your best, always. If it is anything less, toss it in a drawer and start again.

Is there anything else besides writing you think people would find interesting

about you?

            I love to laugh, I love to make other people laugh, and I love a good joke, the dirtier the better. My favorite comedian of all time is George Carlin, but I was once kicked out of Social Studies class for listening to Sam Kinison on my buddy’s Walkman and uncontrollably laughing my ass off.

What are the best ways to connect with you, or find out more about your work?

            Connect with me on Twitter @JoesBlackTShirt and on Facebook @ Author-Joe-Schwartz. Probably the easiest way to find my work is on Amazon at http://tinyurl.com/k3bjyk2 My favorite way to be discovered and read, though, is from the shelves of local libraries. I encourage you if I’m not shelved at your favorite branch ask your local librarian to add my work to the collection. For this, I will thank you when we all get to heaven.

 

February: The Outmate

 

This title is still available for Kindle and in print at Amazon.

Here’s more about it from the original interview:

What initially got you interested in writing?

 

I’ve never not been interested in writing. (Yes I know, double negative) I’ve been writing for so long I don’t remember NOT writing.  It’s never been a choice for me- when the Muse hits I go with it. I enter a trance-like state that takes me over. I don’t eat for days, I don’t sleep, and I walk around mumbling. I bump into walls because I’m having a dialogue in my head. I honestly don’t believe the words that come out of my fingers in those trances are mine… I think they are some sort of higher power. That being said, when I have to go back and edit my work, that’s where I come in. That’s when the real writer comes out.

 

How did you decide to make the move into becoming a published author?

 

I never planned to write The Outmate. It just sort of happened. But when it did, I knew it was time to publish for the first time. I decided early on to self publish. It was not that I felt a conventional publishing house would not be interested. It wasn’t self-doubt. It was control. I am a control freak, and I wanted complete creative control over my novel. I couldn’t stand the thought of someone who had no idea who I am or what my story is telling me what parts of my novel to cut or change. Is that helpful or a hindrance? Is it arrogance? I am not sure. I did what I felt was the right thing for me personally, and I have no qualms now over my decision. It’s harder to market my book as a self published author for sure… but I’d rather know that the finished product is completely mine and told the way I want it told.

 

 

What do you want readers to take away from reading your works?

 

I want them to lose themselves in the story just like I did. The most gratifying experience of my entire life was when my first fan came back to me and told me they understood what I was trying to get across, creating such dark and sexy characters. Readers might not agree with me. They might be disturbed, horrified, turned on, or any combination of emotions by the contents of my book. It is a rather shocking book and it’s not supposed to leave you with warm fuzzies. But when I hear from a reader who allowed themselves to get sucked in to my novel without preconceptions, it means the world to me. I believe we all have darkness within us and that there are many ways to express love if only you step outside the box.

 

What do you find most rewarding about writing?

 

The most rewarding thing for me is to know I’ve created a world that lives now in the minds of others. If I die tomorrow my words will still be here. I guess you could say this is my legacy. I have no children and I cannot have them for biological reasons… But I have my writing. That will never go away.  In a way, it’s embracing immortality.

 

What do you find most challenging about writing?

 

Editing! Writing when the Muse is on your shoulder is practically orgasmic. You are so deep in the throes of your addiction to words that all the cares of the world fall away. Editing, however, takes focus- discipline- and some sort of attention span. Icky! I would much rather be lost in the Muse than edit, however I see the balance of doing both, as an artist, and as a human being. Sometimes we just have to do what we don’t like in order to be a well-rounded individual.

 

 

What advice would you give to people wanting to enter the field?

 

The same advice I would give every time to this question, and I hope every writer out there would give when asked the same. Write! Do it every day. Sit down every day and write no matter if what you churn out is brilliance or crap. Hemmingway said, “There’s nothing to being a writer. You just sit down to a typewriter and bleed.” That’s so true. Just do it. Sooner or later the Muse will hit you like a freight train and everything will fall into place.

 

Is there anything else besides writing you think people would find interesting

about you?

 

I would hope there’s lots people would find interesting about me besides my writing… (For instance I can cook! And sail!)  But for now, I’ll simply say that I am the dedicated beloved of an inmate, and my story comes mostly from true-life experiences. Not all of them. I didn’t burn anyone’s face off or go on a massive crime rampage with a serial killer. Not yet anyway. But yes, I am an inmate’s proud woman. A lot of my hopes, fears, frustrations, and feelings while I wait for him went into this book. I hope when people read it they see that beyond the sex and the violence, there’s a lot of humanity, too. I hope it gives them new insight into the life of an Outmate. I paid my dues to see my work in print, and I wrote it as much for my sister prison wives as I did for myself.

 

What are the best ways to connect with you, or find out more about your work?

 

You can reach me and see more regarding the book via my website, www.theoutmate.com

Also you can connect with me on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Outmate/

 

 

March: Snickering out Loud

You can still get this book on Kindle or in print on Amazon.

Below is a copy of the original interview.

What initially got you interested in writing?

I’ve always been appreciative of good grammar and reading great literary works since a very young age. I started this book as a thought, not necessarily as creating a book, about five or six years ago.

While performing clinical, scientific research, I published papers in scientific journals. Well, those writings aren’t as entertaining to read and write, but they did give me a substantial base for writing a story of my own. And boy did I have a great time writing this book!

 

How did you decide to make the move into becoming a published author?

            It was at the behest of my publicist when she brought something up about dating. I can’t recall the full conversation, but it reminded me of having jotted down ideas and tips over the years. I would go back to the original document and add in tips and things that had happened upon my dating escapades. So gradually, over the years, pages were added. When I would discuss my stories with friends and family, they always laughed. It could be the delivery and my odd facial contortions that I create when telling a story, but I thought I might have something worth a laugh brewing on my computer.

 

What do you want readers to take away from reading your works?

            That’s it’s okay to choose a dinkus to date, as long as you don’t continue to do so. If you mess up and don’t understand the signals being received so well, it’s okay. Learn from it, and laugh about it. The main thing I tell people that come to me for dating advice is to figure out a way to let it go and talk about it with your friends and family behind closed doors. Make fun of the situation and have a damn good chuckle about it all.

 

What do you find most rewarding about writing?

            It’s very cathartic. And it’s amazing to be able to share your work publicly. It’s that impact words can have on people that any other form of communication just doesn’t quite have.

 

What do you find most challenging about writing?

            The most challenging thing is to remove yourself from getting too inside your head. You can’t make everyone love your book and make everyone happy, that’s where your state of mind needs to stay. Don’t write for other people’s acceptance, rather write for yourself and your happiness.

 

What advice would you give to people wanting to enter the field?

            Jot down ideas over a period of time, let it all simmer then come to a boil after a longer period of time. It’s like reacting in a heated argument with a loved one. You probably don’t want to say some of the things that immediately pop into your head. Get your thoughts together and start whenever you have a clear vision, not taking a gazillion different forks in the road because that will end up being frustrating rather than rewarding.

 

Is there anything else besides writing you think people would find interesting about you?

            Hmmmm, I suppose my back story and where I came from, how I have created my life story. I worked on my family farm for about 15 years, and I still help every planting and harvest season. I mentioned it in the book, the first time I’ve been public about my IQ score, but having a substantial score and being in the modeling and acting world is kind of odd. Going from modeling, to published scientific author, to actor, and now writer is pretty cool. I’ve enjoyed my ride, and I don’t plan on it stopping anytime soon. I follow my heart but use my brain along the way.

 

What are the best ways to connect with you, or find out more about your work?

My website – http://www.jennysauer.com/ – or on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jenny-Sauer/149383945083393) or Twitter (@jennymsauer). I’ll make announcements there about the book and also guest articles I’m asked to write about health, beauty and of course, dating!  Drop by and say hi, I’d love to connect!

 

April: Mystic Wolves

This book can still be obtained for Kindle, in Print, and Audible from Amazon.

May: There are actually issues with the records that are making it difficult to me to find any usable content in the old site e-mails.  More content also appeared on retired sister site discoverwords.com that month than INFINITE HOUSE OF BOOKS had seen. Surprisingly, it seemed to be a rather quiet month… all the more need for the summer event to follow.

June: To Die a Stranger

This book is still available for Kindle and  in Print on Amazon.

Jilly Paddock one was one of the authors kicking off a SUMMER OF PRO SE event, featuring a group of artists from Pro Se Press that I had begun to interact with and find myself with published stories alongside in 2015.

Join us next month to find out the recap for the second half of 2015 in the countdown to 5 years online in April 2017!